Back to All News

Greens launch new plan to implement the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Australian Greens have launched a new plan to implement the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Australia, marking the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples.

"Australia is a signatory to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but this is not being reflected in the policy making of the old parties," Senator Rachel Siewert said today.

"There has been very little work undertaken so far by the federal government to translate our commitment into a genuine legal framework that would ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are consulted and can have a level of control over the decisions made by Governments about their lives.

"Australia has been criticised by the international community for the measures which have been imposed on the Northern Territory through the NT Intervention and Stronger Futures. We are currently failing to live up to our obligations, and this needs to be addressed.

"A caring society protects the human rights of its citizens. The Greens' initiative will help translate Australia's support for the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People on the world stage into real change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at home.

"Our plan proposes that the Human Rights Commission and the First People's Congress create a comprehensive national action plan that will provide the roadmap for Government and civil society about how to implement the UN DRIP into Australian law and policy making. A key component of this will be ensuring the community is fully engaged in this process.

"To deliver on this initiative, $15 million in grants will be provided to NGOs from July 2014 to facilitate their participation in developing the National Action Plan and to help them raise awareness about the Declaration and educate all parts of the community about the commitments that Australia has made.

"For too long, Australian Governments, both state and federal, have imposed policy solutions upon Aboriginal people rather than working in genuine partnerships with communities to ensure that policy solutions are culturally appropriate and community-led.

"The creation of a National Action Plan is important in our ongoing work towards reconciliation and equality, while also ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can exercise self-determination," Senator Siewert concluded.

The Greens propose to:

Support the Human Rights Commission and the First People's Congress to create a comprehensive national action plan that will provide the roadmap for Government and civil society on how to implement the UN DRIP into Australian law and policy making.
Ensure that the community is fully engaged in the process by providing $15 million in grants over three years, from July 2014, to non-government organisations to:

• facilitate their participation in developing the National Action Plan; and

• help NGOs raise awareness about the Declaration and educate all parts of the community about the commitments that Australia has made by signing up to the Declaration

 

Back to All News