Innovation, Industry & Science

A flexible and inclusive industry policy is crucial to our economic future and creating jobs.

There are many challenges to sections of Australia’s industry particularly from the mining boom.

The mining bubble is driving up the Australian dollar and hurting other sectors of the economy particularly manufacturing, education, and tourism.

Industry policy must assist industry with these challenges and support investment in innovation that can help these industries survive and flourish.

Innovation is central to the transformation of economy as we move to a sustainable clean energy economy.

news-stories

Greens getting on with the job

01 Sep 2011

1 September marks one year since the Australian Greens signed an historic agreement with Prime Minister Julia Gillard's Labor Government.

The Gillard agreement has achieved outcomes for Australians in terms of passage of bills and lack of confrontation between the houses. We have consultation instead of confrontation.The agreement was reached after the Greens secured a breakthrough win with Adam Bandt in the lower house seat of Melbourne and a record number of senators, and contains detailed policy and accountability mechanisms.

One year on many of these are now in place.

1 September marks one year since the Australian Greens signed an historic agreement with Prime Minister Julia Gillard's Labor Government.

The Gillard agreement has achieved outcomes for Australians in terms of passage of bills and lack of confrontation between the houses. We have consultation instead of confrontation.

The agreement was reached after the Greens secured a breakthrough win with Adam Bandt in the lower house seat of Melbourne and a record number of senators, and contains detailed policy and accountability mechanisms.

One year on many of these are now in place.

media-releases

R&D bill delivers for Australian innovators

23 Aug 2011

The research and development reforms passed in the Parliament today increase support for small and medium sized businesses, particularly after the Greens secured amendments to help the cash-flow of these companies which are the engine room of innovation in Australia.The agreement to make quarterly cash payments to small and medium-sized companies, instead of annual tax credits, was reached after a lengthy consultation by the Greens with a broad range of industry representatives."Imagination is the resource of the 21st century," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said.

The research and development reforms passed in the Parliament today increase support for small and medium sized businesses, particularly after the Greens secured amendments to help the cash-flow of these companies which are the engine room of innovation in Australia.

The agreement to make quarterly cash payments to small and medium-sized companies, instead of annual tax credits, was reached after a lengthy consultation by the Greens with a broad range of industry representatives.

"Imagination is the resource of the 21st century," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said.

media-releases

Music Matters: a refreshing new take on copyright

10 Aug 2011

The Music Matters campaign launched today in Australia and New Zealand is a refreshing new take on supporting artists for their work through a ‘trust mark' to help fans choose to consume music in a way that supports the artists.The Greens welcome this initiative as an important step in reconciling the need to support artists for their creative work with the increasingly diffuse means of consumption and online sharing culture which can bring tremendous benefits to creative artists."Australians know that music matters and hugely value the stories that musicians tell us about who we are, who we have been and who we might become," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said."It is refreshing to see a campaign that brings fans to the question of copyright through their appreciation of music and a valuing of musicians instead of through the prism of criminality.

The Music Matters campaign launched today in Australia and New Zealand is a refreshing new take on supporting artists for their work through a ‘trust mark' to help fans choose to consume music in a way that supports the artists.

The Greens welcome this initiative as an important step in reconciling the need to support artists for their creative work with the increasingly diffuse means of consumption and online sharing culture which can bring tremendous benefits to creative artists.

"Australians know that music matters and hugely value the stories that musicians tell us about who we are, who we have been and who we might become," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said.

"It is refreshing to see a campaign that brings fans to the question of copyright through their appreciation of music and a valuing of musicians instead of through the prism of criminality.

media-releases

Science needs more support: Bandt

09 Aug 2011

The government needs to set a national goal for research and development spending of at least 3% of GDP, Greens MP Adam Bandt told a meeting of the biotechnology industry today.
Addressing the breakfast meeting of the BioMelbourne Network at Melbourne's Federation Square , Mr Bandt said while there had been increased business investment in R&D, government funding was lagging behind.
"I believe that science, technology and innovation are crucial to Australia's current and future prosperity," Mr Bandt said.
"I intend to be a fierce advocate for the importance of scientific research and the need for it to be adequately funded and supported."
"While there has been an upward trend in overall expenditure on R&D, this has largely been a result of an increase in expenditure by the resources and energy sector."
"The proportion of government's contribution to the country's research effort has fallen dramatically from 22.6% of total expenditure in 2000-01 to 12.3% in 2008-09."
"While our expenditure on R&D as a proportion of GDP has increased, we are still below the OECD average and a long way from where we should be, which is up around 3% like Japan and Germany."
"I believe the government needs to make a commitment to increased R&D funding and set a national goal of at least 3% of GDP."
"That will require an increase in public funding but also a greater contribution from the private sector as well."
Adam Bandt is the Greens spokesperson on Science and Research and Innovation and Industry.
 

The government needs to set a national goal for research and development spending of at least 3% of GDP, Greens MP Adam Bandt told a meeting of the biotechnology industry today.


Addressing the breakfast meeting of the BioMelbourne Network at Melbourne's Federation Square , Mr Bandt said while there had been increased business investment in R&D, government funding was lagging behind.


"I believe that science, technology and innovation are crucial to Australia's current and future prosperity," Mr Bandt said.


"I intend to be a fierce advocate for the importance of scientific research and the need for it to be adequately funded and supported."


"While there has been an upward trend in overall expenditure on R&D, this has largely been a result of an increase in expenditure by the resources and energy sector."


"The proportion of government's contribution to the country's research effort has fallen dramatically from 22.6% of total expenditure in 2000-01 to 12.3% in 2008-09."


"While our expenditure on R&D as a proportion of GDP has increased, we are still below the OECD average and a long way from where we should be, which is up around 3% like Japan and Germany."


"I believe the government needs to make a commitment to increased R&D funding and set a national goal of at least 3% of GDP."


"That will require an increase in public funding but also a greater contribution from the private sector as well."


Adam Bandt is the Greens spokesperson on Science and Research and Innovation and Industry.


 

news-stories

Save and expand foreign aid

19 Jul 2011

This month the world is learning about the ongoing famine in the Horn of Africa, where about 12 million people have been hit by the worst drought in almost 60 years. Australia has pledged more than $11 million in aid. It's heart-wrenching to see malnourished children in refugee camps in Kenya with tubes in their noses to feed them because their hungry mothers cannot.

This month the world is learning about the ongoing famine in the Horn of Africa, where about 12 million people have been hit by the worst drought in almost 60 years. Australia has pledged more than $11 million in aid. It's heart-wrenching to see malnourished children in refugee camps in Kenya with tubes in their noses to feed them because their hungry mothers cannot.

media-releases

Carbon price will cut pollution now, lay foundations for science-based climate action

10 Jul 2011

Australia will start to cut carbon pollution immediately and is laying firm foundations for more ambitious, science-based climate action in the years ahead thanks to the Multi-Party Climate Change Committee agreement announced today."The Greens promised to deliver a climate action package which was a platform for stronger action rather than a ceiling which held Australia back and we have done just that," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said."With the establishment of an expert Climate Change Authority, the lifting of the 2050 target to 80%, the five year scheme caps updated each and every year from 2015, and a price floor introduced at the same time, I am confident that this package can deliver real, science-based pollution cuts."The groundbreaking support for renewable energy, energy efficiency and landscape carbon, the contracts for closure of coal fired power plants and the limits on the use of international offsets ensure that pollution cuts which were pushed into the distant future under the government's original plans will start now.

Australia will start to cut carbon pollution immediately and is laying firm foundations for more ambitious, science-based climate action in the years ahead thanks to the Multi-Party Climate Change Committee agreement announced today.

"The Greens promised to deliver a climate action package which was a platform for stronger action rather than a ceiling which held Australia back and we have done just that," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said.

"With the establishment of an expert Climate Change Authority, the lifting of the 2050 target to 80%, the five year scheme caps updated each and every year from 2015, and a price floor introduced at the same time, I am confident that this package can deliver real, science-based pollution cuts.

"The groundbreaking support for renewable energy, energy efficiency and landscape carbon, the contracts for closure of coal fired power plants and the limits on the use of international offsets ensure that pollution cuts which were pushed into the distant future under the government's original plans will start now.

media-releases

Abbott being irresponsible with Whyalla residents for his own political purposes

05 Jul 2011

The Federal Opposition leader is being irresponsible in his claims that the OneSteel plant in Whyalla will close should a price on carbon pollution be introduced, the Greens said today.

The Federal Opposition leader is being irresponsible in his claims that the OneSteel plant in Whyalla will close should a price on carbon pollution be introduced, the Greens said today.

media-releases

Brown says Abbott is unwise to consort with Monckton

23 Jun 2011

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott should rethink plans to associate with Lord Monckton, Greens Leader Bob Brown said today.
"Monckton's despicable abuse of Professor Ross Garnaut can't simply be shaken off and accommodated as free speech," Senator Brown said in Canberra.
"Last year, Mr Abbott met Viscount Monckton of Brenchley and he will renew that association next week at a mining conference in Perth. I urge Mr Abbott to think again," Senator Brown said.
"Monckton's speech to the conference, entitled ‘How many beans make five? Math lessons for climate-crazed lawmakers' makes a mockery of Mr Abbott's own commitment to emissions reduction targets and professed ‘direct action' plan," Senator Brown said.
"The mining industry should ensure Monckton apologises to Professor Garnaut before their sponsorship proceeds," Senator Brown said.
 

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott should rethink plans to associate with Lord Monckton, Greens Leader Bob Brown said today.


"Monckton's despicable abuse of Professor Ross Garnaut can't simply be shaken off and accommodated as free speech," Senator Brown said in Canberra.


"Last year, Mr Abbott met Viscount Monckton of Brenchley and he will renew that association next week at a mining conference in Perth. I urge Mr Abbott to think again," Senator Brown said.


"Monckton's speech to the conference, entitled ‘How many beans make five? Math lessons for climate-crazed lawmakers' makes a mockery of Mr Abbott's own commitment to emissions reduction targets and professed ‘direct action' plan," Senator Brown said.


"The mining industry should ensure Monckton apologises to Professor Garnaut before their sponsorship proceeds," Senator Brown said.


 

media-releases

Greens secure further support for small companies in R&D bill

15 Jun 2011

The Greens will support the government's research and development reforms because they increase support for small and medium sized businesses engaging in R&D, particularly after the Greens secured amendments to help the cash-flow of these companies which are the engine room of innovation in Australia.The agreement to make quarterly cash payments to small and medium-sized companies, instead of annual tax credits, was reached after a lengthy consultation by the Greens with a broad range of industry representatives."Innovation is critical to our economy, to our health, to our environment and it is vital that government support is as effective and efficient as possible," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said."Australians are famous for being early adopters - we love technology and innovation. We also believe in a fair go and know that the best ideas often come from the underdog.

The Greens will support the government's research and development reforms because they increase support for small and medium sized businesses engaging in R&D, particularly after the Greens secured amendments to help the cash-flow of these companies which are the engine room of innovation in Australia.

The agreement to make quarterly cash payments to small and medium-sized companies, instead of annual tax credits, was reached after a lengthy consultation by the Greens with a broad range of industry representatives.

"Innovation is critical to our economy, to our health, to our environment and it is vital that government support is as effective and efficient as possible," Australian Greens Deputy Leader, Senator Christine Milne, said.

"Australians are famous for being early adopters - we love technology and innovation. We also believe in a fair go and know that the best ideas often come from the underdog.

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